Pang CP photo_1

Prof Calvin CP PANG

S.H. Ho Research Professor of Visual Sciences

BSc (Lond), DPhil (Oxon), FARVO

Contact :

(852) 3943 5801

Academic Appointments

  • S.H. Ho Research Professor of Visual Sciences, CUHK
  • Director, Shantou University / The Chinese University of Hong Kong Joint Shantou International Eye Center

Biography

Prof Pang received BSc (Hon) in Biochemistry in 1978, University of London, and DPhil in 1982, University of Oxford, on an EP Abraham Research Fund Scholarship, followed by postdoctoral research in Oxford. In December 1983, Prof Pang was appointed Lecturer in Chemical Pathology at the Chinese University of Hong Kong (CUHK) and became a Professor in 1995. In 1998, Prof Pang moved to the Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences (DOVS) of CUHK. He was appointed Chair Professor in Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences in 2008 and bestowed the S.H. Ho Professorship in Visual Sciences in 2010. From 2012 to 2015 Prof Pang was Chairman of the Department. Since 2012 he is Director of the Shantou University/CUHK Joint Shantou International Eye Center.

Prof Pang has served as academic assessor or reviewer of more than 25 funding and scientific institutions worldwide, including the Wellcome Trust (UK), National Eye Institute (USA), ARVO (USA), National Medical Research Council (Singapore), Ministry of Health (Singapore), Health Research Board (Ireland), Catalan Agency for Health Technology Assessment and Research (Spain), National Science Foundation China, Changjiang Scholar Program China, and Ophthalmology Basis Research Advancement Committee, Chinese Ophthalmological Society, Chinese Medical Association.  He is also external examiner or visiting professor of more than 30 academic institutions including University of Melbourne, Flinders University Australia, Purdue University USA, National University of Singapore, Hebrew University of Jerusalem Israel, Peking University, Shanghai Fudan University, Zhejiang University, Shanghai Institute of Medical Genetics, University of Hong Kong and Hong Kong Polytechnic University.  Prof Pang has been convener of the visual sciences programmes of Asia Pacific Academy of Ophthalmology (APAO), World Ophthalmology Congress (WOC) and International Society for Eye Research (ISER) Congresses.

Prof Pang has delivered more than 300 invited lectures nationally and internationally. He received the China State Scientific and Technological Progress Award (SSTPA) second-class award in 2016, Special Achievement Award of Chinese Ophthalmological Society in 2017, and Senior Achievement Award, APAO in 2018. In 2017 Prof Pang delivered the National Institute of Health – Global Health Vision Lecture, Bethesda, USA. In 2018 Prof Pang became a Fellow of ARVO and has been honoured as the 2020 ARVO Foundation honoree. In 2021, Prof Pang was conferred ‘Honorary Fellow’ of the College of Ophthalmologists of Hong Kong.

Research Areas

  1. Molecular genomics, gene mapping and identification, whole genome sequencing, whole exome sequencing, and GWAS, on complex eye diseases: primary open angle glaucoma, primary angle closure glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration, polypoidal choridal vasculopathy, central serous chorioretinopathy, myopia, uveitis, thyroid eye diseases and keratoconus.
  2. Molecular genetics, epi-genetics risk factors and mechanisms: glaucoma, macular diseases, retinoblastoma, diabetic retinopathy, retinitis pigmentosa, myopia, uveitis, thyroid eye diseases and dry eye diseases.
  3. Biology of human ocular cells: trabecular meshwork cells, periodontal ligament-derived neural crest stem cells, corneal progenitor cells, ciliary and iris epithelial cells, adipose tissue derived stromal cells, retinoblastoma cells, and retinal ganglion cells.
  4. Metabolomics and animal models of eye diseases: optic nerve crush, elevated IOP, retina degeneration, experimental induced uveitis, and experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis.
  5. Therapeutic effects and pharmacokinetics of small herbal molecules, green tea extract, catechins, neuropeptides as agonists and antagonists of growth hormone-releasing hormone receptor in ocular oxidative stress, inflammations, and degeneration.
  6. Risk factors, genetics and prevention of children eye diseases and childhood myopia. The concept of health care through children eye care.
  7. Applications of artificial intelligence to detection of complex eye diseases and robotics.
  8. Contemporary medical issues such as ophthalmic effects of Covid-19.

Research Programmes

  1. Molecular genomics and gene mapping on glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration, polypoidal choridal vasculopathy, myopia, and congenital cataracts.
  2. Molecular genetics and mechanisms of glaucoma, macular diseases, high myopia, uveitis, etinoblastoma, Bietti crystalline dystrophy, Graves’ ophthalmopathy, diabetic retinopathy, diabetic macular edema, retinitis pigmentosa, keratoconus, and cornea dystrophies.
  3. Therapeutic effects of herbal molecules and GHRHR (growth hormone related hormone receptor) agonists and antagonists in eye diseases.
  4. Animal models of ophthalmic inflammation and retina degeneration.
  5. Analytical studies: gas chromatography, high performance liquid chromatography, tandem mass spectrometry. Sample molecules, including herbal molecules and peptides, identification, characterization, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics.

Accomplishments

  1. Through international consortiums and collaborations, novel gene loci and variants have been identified for complex eye diseases. Examples: (i) Gharahkhani P al. Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies 127 open-angle glaucoma loci with consistent effect across ancestries. Nat Commun. 2021;12:1258. (ii) Bonnemaijer PWM et.al. Multi-trait genome-wide association study identifies new loci associated with optic disc parameters. Commun Biol. 2019;2:435 (iii ) Khor C.C. et.al, Genome-wide association study identifies five new susceptibility loci for primary angle closure glaucoma. Nat Genet. 2016;48:556-62. (iv) Huang L et.al. A missense variant in FGD6 confers increased risk of polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy. Nat Genet. 2016;48:640-7. (v) Chen Y et.al. Common variants near ABCA1 and in PMM2 are associated with primary open-angle glaucoma. Nat Genet. 2014;46:1115-9. (vi) Verhoeven VJ et.al. Genome-wide meta-analyses of multiancestry cohorts identify multiple new susceptibility loci for refractive error and myopia. Nat Genet. 2013;45:314-8 (vii)Thorleifsson G et.al. Sequence variants near the CAV1 and CAV2 genes associate with primary open angle glaucoma. Nat Genet. 2010;42:906-9. (viii) DeWan A, et.al. HTRA serine protease predisposes Asians to age-related macular degeneration. Science 2006;314:989-92.
  2. With Dr Guy LJ Chen and genetics team: new genes and gene variants identified for AMD and Examples: (i) Chen ZJ et.al. Identification of TIE2 as a susceptibility gene for neovascular age-related macular degeneration and polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy. Br J Ophthalmol. 2021;105:1035-40 (ii) Ma L et.al. Identification and characterization of a novel promoter variant in placental growth factor for neovascular age-related macular degeneration. Exp Eye Res. 2019;187:107748. (iii) Ma L et.al. Identification of ANGPT2 as a new gene for neovascular age-related macular degeneration and polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy in the Chinese and Japanese populations. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2017;58:1076-83. (iv) Chen LJ et.al. Identification of PGF as a new gene for neovascular age-related macular degeneration in a Chinese Population. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2016;57:1714-20.
  3. We are establishing ethnic differentiation in the glaucoma genes: Examples: (i) Lu SY al. Association of SIX1-SIX6 polymorphisms with peripapillary retinal nerve fibre layer thickness in children. Br J Ophthalmol. 2022 Jan 11. (ii) Lu SY et.al. Association of the CAV1-CAV2 locus with normal-tension glaucoma in Chinese and Japanese. Clin Exp Ophthalmol. 2020;48:658-65. (iii) Gong B, et.al.. Mutant RAMP2 causes primary open-angle glaucoma via the CRLR-cAMP axis. Genet Med. 2019;21:2345-2354. (iv) Xiao X et al. Exome sequencing reveals a heterozygous OAS3 mutation in a Chinese family with juvenile-onset open-angle glaucoma. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2019;60:4277-84. (v) Rong SS et.al. Genetic associations of primary angle-closure disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Ophthalmology. 2016;123:1211-21.
  4. With Dr WK Chu, Dr LP Cen, Prof SO Chan and laboratory based teams, we have proved the involvements of ocular inflammation of the GHRH-GH-IGF1 Axis and confirmed the therapeutic potential of GHRH-R antagonists. (i) Cen LP al. Agonist of growth hormone-releasing hormone enhances retinal ganglion cell protection induced by macrophages after optic nerve injury. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA. 2021;118:e1920834118 (ii ) Liang WC et.al. Signaling mechanisms of growth hormone-releasing hormone receptor in LPS-induced acute ocular inflammation. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2020;117:6067-74. (iii) Chu WK et.al. Antagonists of growth hormone-releasing hormone receptor induce apoptosis specifically in retinoblastoma cells. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA. 2016;113:14396-401. (iv) Qin YJ et.al. Antagonist of GH-releasing hormone receptors alleviates experimental ocular inflammation. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA. 2014;111:18303-8.
  5. We further establish the anti-oxidative properties of green tea catechins and their therapeutic potential. (i) Li J al. Anti-inflammatory effects of GTE in eye diseases. Front Nutr. 2021;8:753955. (ii) Yang Y et.al. Green tea extract ameliorates ischemia-induced retinal ganglion cell degeneration in rats. Oxid Med Cell Longev. 2019;2019:8407206. (iii) Li J et.al. Green tea catechins alleviate autoimmune symptoms and visual impairment in a murine model for human chronic intraocular inflammation by inhibiting Th17-associated pro-inflammatory gene expression. Sci Rep. 2019;9:2301. (iv) Chu KO et.al. Metabolomics of green-tea catechins on vascular-endothelial-growth-factor-stimulated human-endothelial-cell survival. J Agric Food Chem. 2018;66:12866-12875. (v) Chu KO et.al. Effects of EGCG content in green tea extract on pharmacokinetics, oxidative status and expression of inflammatory and apoptotic genes in the rat ocular tissues. J Nutr Biochem. 2015;26:1357-67. (iv) Chu KO et.al. Green tea catechins and their oxidative protection in the rat eye. J Agric Food Chem. 2010;58:1523-34.
  6. With CUHK and JSIEC AI (artificial intelligence) teams, protocols have been established for AI applications in ophthalmology. Examples: (i) Cen LP al. Automatic detection of 39 fundus diseases and conditions in retinal photographs using deep neural networks. Nat Commun. 2021;12:4828. (ii) Wang J, et.al. Automated explainable multidimensional deep learning platform of retinal images for retinopathy of prematurity screening. JAMA Netw Open. 2021;4:e218758. (iii) Ran AR et.al. Detection of glaucomatous optic neuropathy with spectral-domain optical coherence tomography: a retrospective training and validation deep-learning analysis. Lancet Digit Health. 2019;1:e172-e182.
  7. With CUHK and JSIEC Covid-19 study teams, ophthalmic issues due to Covid-19 have been addressed with new discoveries. Examples: (i) Wan KH, al. Ocular surface disturbance in patients after acute COVID-19. Clin Exp Ophthalmol. 2022 ceo.14066. (ii) Zhang X, et.al. Myopia incidence and lifestyle changes among school children during the COVID-19 pandemic: a population-based prospective study. Br J Ophthalmol. 2021-319307. (iii)  Peng Y et.al. Real-time prediction of the daily incidence of COVID-19 in 215 countries and territories using machine learning: model development and validation. J Med Internet Res. 2021;23:e24285. (iv) Li C et.al. Retrospective analysis of the possibility of predicting the COVID-19 outbreak from Internet searches and social media data, China, 2020. Euro Surveill. 2020;25:2000199.
  8. With Dr Jason Yam and Children Eye Study team, treatment protocols for childhood myopia and treatment issues with serious eye diseases have been addressed. Examples: (i) Wong ES, al. Global retinoblastoma survival and globe preservation: a systematic review and meta-analysis of associations with socioeconomic and health-care factors. Lancet Glob Health. 2022;10:e380-e389. (ii) Yam JC et.al. Three-year clinical trial of Low-Concentration Atropine for Myopia Progression (LAMP) Study: continued versus washout: Phase 3 report. Ophthalmology. 2022;129:308-21. (iii) Li FF et.al. Age effect on treatment responses to 0.05%, 0.025%, and 0.01% atropine: Low-Concentration Atropine for Myopia Progression Study. Ophthalmology. 2021;128:1180-7. (iv) Li J et.al. Exposure to secondhand smoke in children is associated with a thinner retinal nerve fiber layer: The Hong Kong Children Eye Study. Am J Ophthalmol. 2021;223:91-9. (v) Li FF et.al. Differential effects on ocular biometrics by 0.05%, 0.025%, and 0.01% atropine: Low-Concentration Atropine for Myopia Progression Study. Ophthalmology. 2020;127:1603-11. (vi) Yam JC et.al. Two-year clinical trial of the Low-Concentration Atropine for Myopia Progression (LAMP) Study: Phase 2 Report. Ophthalmology. 2020;127:910-9. (vii) Tang SM et.al. Independent influence of parental myopia on childhood myopia in a dose-related manner in 2,055 trios: The Hong Kong Children Eye Study. Am J Ophthalmol. 2020;218:199-207. (viii) Yuan N et.al. Association of secondhand smoking exposure with choroidal thinning in children aged 6 to 8 years: The Hong Kong Children Eye Study. JAMA Ophthalmol. 2019;137:1406-14. (xi) Yam JC et.al. Low-Concentration Atropine for Myopia Progression (LAMP) Study: A randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial of 0.05%, 0.025%, and 0.01% atropine eye drops in myopia control. Ophthalmology. 2019;126:113-24.
  9. Collaboration with Dr Y Fai Leung of Purdue University USA, a world leader in retina investigations in zebrafish models, novel retina disease mechanisms are revealed. Examples: (i) Venkatraman P al. Rods contribute to visual behavior in larval zebrafish. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2020;61:11 (ii) Xie R et.al. Normalization of large-scale behavioural data collected from zebrafish. PLoS One. 2019;14:e0212234. (iii) Ganzen L et.al. Utilizing zebrafish visual behaviors in drug screening for retinal degeneration. Int J Mol Sci. 2017;18:1185. (iv) Zhang L et.al. A naturally-derived compound schisandrin B enhanced light sensation in the pde6c zebrafish model of retinal degeneration. PLoS One. 2016;11:e0149663.

Representative Publications:

  1. >510 papers in international indexed peer reviewed journals, 28 book chapters, edition of 3 journal special issues and 1 book, and more than 800 abstracts in international conference proceedings. Citation metrics 30th April 2022 Google Scholar: Sum of the Times Cited: >21,500. h-index: 77.
  2. Selected Publications:      
    1. Wong ES, al. Global retinoblastoma survival and globe preservation: a systematic review and meta-analysis of associations with socioeconomic and health-care factors. Lancet Glob Health. 2022 Mar;10(3):e380-e389.
    2. Yam JC, al. The association of choroidal thickening by atropine with treatment effects for myopia: Two-Year clinical trial of the Low-concentration Atropine for Myopia Progression (LAMP) Study. Am J Ophthalmol. 2021 Dec 21;237:130-138.
    3. Yam JC, al. Three-Year Clinical Trial of Low-Concentration Atropine for Myopia Progression Study: Continued Versus Washout: Phase 3 Report. Ophthalmology. 2021 Oct 7.
    4. Cen LPal. Automatic detection of 39 fundus diseases and conditions in retinal photographs using deep neural networks. Nat Commun. 2021 Aug 10;12(1):4828.
    5. Li FF, al. Age Effect on Treatment Responses to 0.05%, 0.025%, and 0.01% Atropine: Low-Concentration Atropine for Myopia Progression Study. Ophthalmology. 2021 Aug;128(8):1180-1187.
    6. Cen LP, al. Agonist of growth hormone-releasing hormone enhances retinal ganglion cell protection induced by macrophages after optic nerve injury. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA. 2021;118:e1920834118
    7. Tang SM, al. Independent influence of parental myopia on childhood myopia in a dose-related manner in 2055 Trios: The Hong Kong Children Eye Study. Am J Ophthalmol. 2020;218:199-207.
    8. Wong ES, al. Association of optical coherence tomography angiography metrics with detection of impaired macular microvasculature and decreased vision in amblyopic eyes: The Hong Kong Children Eye Study. JAMA Ophthalmol. 2020;138:858-865.
    9. Yam JC, al. Two-Year Clinical Trial of the Low-concentration Atropine for Myopia Progression (LAMP) Study: Phase 2 Report, Ophthalmology. 2020;127:910-19.
    10. Li C, al. Retrospective analysis of the possibility of predicting the COVID-19 outbreak from Internet searches and social media data, China. Euro Surveill. 2020;25:2000199
    11. Liang WC, al. Signaling mechanisms of growth hormone-releasing hormone receptor in LPS-induced acute ocular inflammation. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA. 2020;117:6067-6074.
    12. Yuan N, al. Association of secondhand smoking exposure with choroidal thinning in children aged 6 to 8 years: The Hong Kong Children Eye Study. JAMA Ophthalmol. 2019;137:1-9.
    13. Yam JC, al. Low-concentration Atropine for Myopia Progression (LAMP) Study: A randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial of 0.05%, 0.025% and 0.01% Atropine eye drops in myopia control. Ophthalmology. 2019;126:113-124.
    14. Chu KO, al. Metabolomics of green-tea catechins on vascular-endothelial-growth-factor-stimulated human-endothelial-cell survival. J Agric Food Chem.2018;66:12866-12875
    15. Cen LP, al. Human periodontal ligament-derived stem cells promote retinal ganglion cell survival and axon regeneration after optic nerve injury. Stem Cells.2018;36:844-855
    16. Wang YM, al. Histological and microRNA signatures of corneal epithelium in keratoconus. J Refract Surg.2018;34:201-211
    17. Chu WK, al Antagonists of growth hormone-releasing hormone receptor induce apoptosis specifically in retinoblastoma cells. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA.2016;113:14396-14401.
    18. Khor CC, al. Genome-wide association study identifies five new susceptibility loci for primary angle closure glaucoma. Nat Genet.2016;48:556-62
    19. Huang L, al. A missense variant in FGD6 confers increased risk of polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy.Nat Genet. 2016;48:640-7
    20. Ma L, al. Association of genetic variants with polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy: a systematic review and updated meta-analysis. Ophthalmology2015;122:1854-65
    21. Huang LZ, al. Whole-exome sequencing implicates UBE3D in age-related macular degeneration in East Asian populations. Nat Commun.20156:6687.
    22. Qin YJ, al. Antagonist of GH-releasing hormone receptor alleviates experimental ocular inflammation. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA.2014;111:18303-8
    23. Chen Y, al. Common variants near ABCA1 and in PMM2 are associated with primary open-angle Nat Genet.2014;46:1115-9
    24. Liu K, al. Genes in the high-density lipoprotein metabolic pathway in age-related macular degeneration and polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy. Ophthalmology2014;121:911-6
    25. Lu Y, al. Genome-wide association analyses identify multiple loci associated with central corneal thickness and keratoconus. Nat Genet2013;45:155-6
    26. Liu K, al. Associations of the C2-CFB-RDBP-SKIV2L locus with age-related macular degeneration and polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy.Ophthalmology. 2013;120:837-43
    27. Vithana EN, al. Genome-wide association analyses identify three new susceptibility loci for primary angle closureglaucoma. Nat Genet.2012;44:1142-6
    28. Thorleifsson G, al. Sequence variants near the CAV1 and CAV2 genes associate with primary open angle glaucoma.Nat Genetics. 2010;42:906-9
    29. Chu KO, et.al. Green tea catechins and their oxidative protection in the rat eye. J Agric Food Chem. 2010;58:1523-34
    30. DeWan A, et.al. HTRA serine protease predisposes Asians to age-related macular degeneration. 2006;314:989-92

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